Month: August 2014

Via dwell  In Oakland, California, two designers transformed a…

Via dwell 

In Oakland, California, two designers transformed a 100-year-old barn into a (very) cozy [400 sq ft] home of their own by redefining the functionality of walls and windowsills.

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grody-san: Looks like the renders of Four Light’s U-House got a…

grody-san:

Looks like the renders of Four Light’s U-House got a bit of a makeover, and two shots have been added! We can now get an idea of what the back bedroom and bathroom would look like. Well, now it’s just back to refreshing the page until the next tantalizing detail appears!

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Michael Douglas just finished his second tiny house. His first…


via Michael Douglas @northtothefuture on IG


The new build is on the left. Photos via Michael Douglas @northtothefuture on IG

Michael Douglas just finished his second tiny house.

His first build was created from a pop-up camper which he used to travel North America this past year. His new tiny house, although larger than the pop-up camper/tiny house hybrid, features an aerodynamic shed roof and reminds me of a miniature version of the Leaf tiny house. Follow his continuing adventures: @northtothefuture on Instagram.

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Kam Kasravi and Connie Dewitt wanted a modern cabin that…

Kam Kasravi and Connie Dewitt wanted a modern cabin that wouldn’t disrupt the Redwoods on their property. First they considered prefabs, but quickly realized they wouldn’t fit up the narrow road to their land in the Santa Cruz mountains. So they convinced their friend, architect David Fenster, to design them a home made from shipping containers.

Built from recycled cargo containers hand-picked from the Port of Oakland, Six Oaks was built around the footprint of the land. The containers were building blocks that were cut and stacked to fit between Redwoods along a steep grade.

While the home was assembled in 6 hours, it took nearly a year to finish the interior since so much of it was custom. The unique materials meant some unique requirements: instead of carpenters, they used welders; a commercial roofer had to be hired, etc.

Acoording to Connie, it wasn’t “the cheapest way to build”, but It cost about $50 per square foot less than a more conventional custom home.

They didn’t aim to build an extreme home, but the couple feel confident their home will hold up well under extreme conditions- i.e. falling trees, forest fires.

David Fenster | MODULUS architects

via Kirsten Dirksen | more

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