Kam Kasravi and Connie Dewitt wanted a modern cabin that…

Kam Kasravi and Connie Dewitt wanted a modern cabin that wouldn’t disrupt the Redwoods on their property. First they considered prefabs, but quickly realized they wouldn’t fit up the narrow road to their land in the Santa Cruz mountains. So they convinced their friend, architect David Fenster, to design them a home made from shipping containers.

Built from recycled cargo containers hand-picked from the Port of Oakland, Six Oaks was built around the footprint of the land. The containers were building blocks that were cut and stacked to fit between Redwoods along a steep grade.

While the home was assembled in 6 hours, it took nearly a year to finish the interior since so much of it was custom. The unique materials meant some unique requirements: instead of carpenters, they used welders; a commercial roofer had to be hired, etc.

Acoording to Connie, it wasn’t “the cheapest way to build”, but It cost about $50 per square foot less than a more conventional custom home.

They didn’t aim to build an extreme home, but the couple feel confident their home will hold up well under extreme conditions- i.e. falling trees, forest fires.

David Fenster | MODULUS architects

via Kirsten Dirksen | more

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HIP House | Jeffrey White HIP stands for humble, insulated and…

HIP House | Jeffrey White

HIP stands for humble, insulated and portable.

Sarah House Utah is a non profit community based organization started at Crossroads Urban Center. Our goal is to provide fast, green minded, safe, and affordable homes for the under-served.

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Sarah House | Jeffery White 672 sq ft container home features an…

Sarah House | Jeffery White

672 sq ft container home features an elegant and inviting front porch area in an effort to reintroduce the communal space into the the dwelling’s current urban landscape.

Sarah House Utah is a non profit community based organization started at Crossroads Urban Center. Our goal is to provide fast, green minded, safe, and affordable homes for the under-served. 

submission by Jeffery White | related viewing via Kirsten Dirksen

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Homesteading, Tokyo Style

Originally posted on SHIKIGAMI:

Like most large cities Tokyo has a sizeable population of homeless people. Tokyo also has a large population of people who are referred to as homeless but who are really just choosing to live differently. I don’t want to romanticise or trivialize the lives of the homeless here.  I’ve already seen plenty of people in Tokyo that are living really rough on the streets. The people I’m talking about here are not missing out, they’re opting out.

Riverside hut, Tokyo

The structure pictured above is part of a homesteaders village on the tree covered levee of the Tamagawa river, Inashiro, Tokyo. In the immediate vicinity of this hut there were about five other dwellings and numerous others were nestled in the dense shrubby areas along the levee.

The occupants of these structures grow food, harvest fuel from the surrounding woodland and earn what money they need by recycling the waste of…

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